Exam 2 question

Hi can you clarify this answer on this question? I get that the right answer is right because it’s not blocking the corridor views which the client wants in this scenario. But it doesn’t consider blocking the north winds, I guess it’s more correct to consider the corridor than blocking the northern winds above?

How do you go about site questions like this, that seem to be which is the better answer?

A home is being designed in a southern climate with prevailing winds coming from the north to northwest. The site is open to the north and south and bordered by existing houses on each side. The owner would like to incorporate sustainable principles of passive cooling during the summer months with the creative use of landscaping. However, the owner would also like to preserve a critical view corridor to the southeast of the property.

What would be the optimal planting arrangement to achieve the owner’s goal of passive cooling?

Plant medium-height deciduous trees on the south to southwest end of the property and cover the southeast facade of the house with deciduous vines

Correct. Deciduous trees are the correct type to block summer sun and allow winter sun. Vines on the southeast facade would serve a similar function, yet preserve the view requirement.

Plant medium-height deciduous trees along the entire southeast end of the property and deciduous vines on the south and southwest facades of the house

Incorrect. The trees on the southeast side would obscure the view corridor, and planting the vines along the majority of the south-southwest exposure may not be adequate to provide passive cooling.

Plant medium-height deciduous trees along the entire south end of the property and evergreen trees along the entire north end of the property

Incorrect. The trees on the south end would block summer sun and allow winter sun, but they would also obscure the view corridor requirement. Evergreen trees on the north end would block prevailing winds that could aid passive cooling.

Plant medium-height deciduous trees on the entire north end of the property and evergreen trees on the entire south end of the property

Incorrect. The deciduous trees on the north end would not be ideal as they would seasonally block prevailing winds and reduce passive cooling potential. Evergreen trees to the south would block the view corridor.

Hello @sergioclaure93 -

Thanks for your question and writing it so clearly including the answer options. In this question they are looking to preserve the view to the south east so the first step would be to eliminate any answer that would block that view. The second step would be to think about the winds from the north/north west and how the owner would like to passively cool the home. Blocking this area would prevent the wind from cooling the space. The final part of the question has to do with type of plant. Make sure that you know what the test is looking for in regards to plant typology and when they are used.

I know questions like this with a hierarchy of information can be frustrating but try to think of them like a puzzle. Make sure that all factors are being addressed by the answer you choose. Remember the more you practice the better you will become at figuring out these questions quickly and accurately, they might even become fun.

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Ok oh I get it, passive cooling doesn’t mean blocking the winds, you’d want it for ventilation and cool the space. Also the plant types, yeah that’s how I’ll approach these questions better. I totally agree practice these more and even have fun with it at one point cause it helps learn it more. Great that’s very helpful.

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